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Environmental Medicine Training Series
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Environmental Medicine Training 
On-Demand Series

Research is increasingly validating the role low-level environmental exposures play in health conditions for individuals worldwide. In the U.S., there are currently 11 million Americans who live within one mile of a Superfund Site and are determined to be at risk of know toxicant exposures; 3 to 4 million of these individuals are children. 

Studies are also validating the concept of total body burden, the sum total of toxicant exposures from lead to BPA, that act synergistically to place an undue burden on both the developing fetus, growing children, and men and women attempting to conceive, as well as those at risk for conditions related to aging. While the body of evidence for the damaging effects of these daily exposures is growing, physicians are challenged in evaluating and assisting their patients who are at highest risk of exposure.

Understanding the toxicology associated with these exposures and identifying laboratory methods of assessment is a crucial part of the knowledge base for integrative physicians practicing medicine in a toxic world. Providers who want to assist patients in more than avoidance strategies and actually address the body burdens related to poor health need to understand the biochemistry and genetics related to toxic exposure and retention as well. Finally, they need to become familiar with the literature on nutritional, plant-based and pharmaceutical strategies necessary to assist the process of biotransformation and elimination of toxicants. 

Using a case-based approach, our faculty, all established as thought leaders and lecturers in this area, will collaborate to present a pioneering course in integrative environmental toxicology. Topics covered will include toxic metals, solvents, pesticides, herbicides, plastics, low-level ionizing radiation, mechanisms of endocrine disruption, and persistent organic pollutants. 


Approved for 36.50 General Credit Hours and 5.75 Pharmacy Credit Hours
by the Oregon Board of Naturopathic Medicine


  


 


 

Topics


Click on the lecture title to view learning objectives for the specific topic. 



General Principles of Toxicant Exposure and Assessment

Faculty: Jason Allen, ND, MPH

 


Individual Risk: The Influence of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms, Nutrient Deficiencies, Synergism of Simultaneous Exposures on Total Body Burden, and the Manifestation of Disease

Faculty: Steve Ottersberg, MS



Physical Exam & Laboratory Evaluation
Faculty: Jessica Tran, ND


Mercury Toxicology

Faculty: Chris Shade, PhD

 


Lead Toxicity

Faculty: Dorothy Merritt, MD



Arsenic & Cadmium Toxicity

Faculty: Lyn Patrick, ND

Air and Water Filtration Technologies
Faculty: Mitch Kennedy, ND, LEED-AP



Consider Zebras - Assessment and Management of Other Problematic Metals in Clinical Practice
Faculty: David Quig, PhD 

 

TACT Trial: Efficacy of EDTA Chelation in Cardiovascular Disease
Faculty: Gervasio Lamas, MD, FACC, FAHA, FESC


DMSA | EDTA | DMPS: Pharmacology and Dosing of Chelating Agents in Metals Toxicity
Faculty: Jessica Tran, ND



EDTA: Mechanisms of EDTA as a Chelating Agent
Faculty: Dorothy Merritt, MD 

 


The Application of Glutathione and Glutathione Prodrugs in the Management of Environmental Illness
Faculty: Tim Guilford, MD

 


Pesticides: Understanding Chronic Exposure
Presented by: Gregg Govett, MD

 


Herbicides: Glyphosate as a Case Study in Herbicide Exposure Related to Disease Relevance
Faculty: Stephanie Seneff, PhD


Persistent Organic Pollutants and Endocrine Disruption
Faculty: David O. Carpenter, MD

Part 1: Plastics (BPA & Phthalates)
Presented by: Frederick vom Saal, PhD

Part 2: A Clinical Approach to Chemical Exposure: Persistent Organic Pollutants, Phthalates, and BPA
Presented by: Stephen Genuis, MD  

 


Solvents
Faculty: Bill Rea, MD  

 


Mold Toxicity
Faculty: Lisa Nagy, MD

 

Electromagnetic Frequency-Related Exposure and Sensitivity
Faculty: Magda Havas, BSc, PhD


Case Management Questions in Environmental Exposure (Mold)

Faculty: Lisa Nagy, MD

 


Transgenic Foods (GMO) - The Evidence: A Review of the Published Research on the Effects of Transgenic Foods in both Animal and Humans
Faculty: Jeffrey Smith, Author & Consumer Advocate 

 


Radiation Exposure: Health Effects
Faculty: Lyn Patrick, ND


Case Management in Environmental Exposure

Faculty: Lyn Patrick, ND


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Course Faculty

Lyn Patrick, ND

Lyn Patrick, ND graduated from Bastyr University in 1984 and has been in private practice for 27 years. She has been a faculty member of the American College for Advancement in Medicine (www.acam.org) continuing medical education conferences, lecturing in the area of metal toxicology and environmental medicine and has served on the Board of Directors at ACAM. She has lectured for the Institute of Functional Medicine and many physician membership organizations nationally and internationally on the subject of environmental medicine.

 

Dr. Patrick is a published author of numerous articles in peer-reviewed medical journals and has been a longtime Contributing Editor for Alternative Medicine Review, a Medline-indexed journal of complementary/alternative medical research (www.altmedrev.com). 
See full bio


Jessica Tran, ND  

Licensed in California and Arizona, Dr. Tran is a doctor of naturopathic medicine with an integrative perspective on health and healing. She received her naturopathic medical degree from Bastyr University, located north of Seattle, Washington. She completed a one-year Family Practice residency, three-year Environmental Medicine fellowship, and served as Clinical Faculty in both the Departments of Environmental Medicine and General Medicine at Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine and Health Sciences in Tempe, AZ. She has a private practice in Irvine, CA focused on environmental medicine.

 

Tim Guilford, MD 

Dr. Guilford's education includes Johns Hopkins University for his undergraduate degree, and the University of Texas Medical Branch for medical school, 2 years general surgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital and he completed ENT surgery residency at the University of Michigan. Dr. Guilford has been in clinical practice since 1979 and has been using complementary medicine as a part of his practice since 1985 and was the director of a clinical laboratory specializing in in-vitro allergy and viral immunology testing (1982-1992). He began using metal detoxification methods in 1995 and research into the toxicity of mercury led to the observation that glutathione is a critical component of the defense against heavy metals in addition to its role as a key component of the antioxidant system. 


Dorothy Merritt, MD 

Dr. Merritt attended medical school at the University of Kansas and completed her Internal Medicine training at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, TX. Dr. Merritt has been active in developing programs that maximize health and wellness while identifying and treating environmentally caused illnesses. Dr. Merritt uses many natural approaches to prevention of illness and integrates them into her primary care practice. 




Lisa Nagy, MD

Lisa Nagy, MD graduated Magna Cum Laude from the University of Pennsylvania and then from Cornell Medical College in 1986. After a surgical internship she completed her Emergency Medicine residency at Metropolitan Hospital in NYC and practiced in Los Angeles. She was recently named to the National Institutes of Health Roundtable on Building and Health. At this meeting she speaks to the need for recognition of Environmental Illness in patients who may also have Lyme Disease - often both related to previous exposure to indoor mold in a home or workplace. 



Christopher Shade, PhD

Dr. Shade obtained B.S. and M.S. degrees from Lehigh University in environmental and aqueous chemistry. Dr. Shade earned a Ph.D. from the University of Illinois where he studied the environmental and analytical chemistries of mercury as well as advanced aquatic chemistry. Dr. Shade turned his focus to the human aspects of mercury exposure/toxicity and the human detoxification system. He has since developed specific clinical analytical techniques for measuring mercury exposure and a system of products for toxic metals removal. His current focus is at the intersection of neuroinflammatory issues, immune dysregulation, toxicity, and infection - specifically how to peel away the layers of overlapping dysfunction in the sick individual until you get to a point at which the system rights itself. 
See Faculty CV


Stephanie Seneff, PhD

Stephanie Seneff is a Senior Research Scientist at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. She has a Bachelor's degree from MIT in biology with a minor in food and nutrition, and a PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, also from MIT. Her research has focused on understanding the effects of certain environmental toxicants, such as aluminum and glyphosate, on human physiology. She proposed that low-micronutrient, high-carbohydrate diet, combined with excess exposure to environmental toxicants, and insufficient sunlight exposure to the skin and eyes, plays a crucial role in many modern conditions and diseases, including heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, GI problems, Alzheimer's disease, and autism. 
See Faculty CV


Steven Ottersburg, MS

Steve obtained a M.S. in Biochemistry from Arizona State University in Tempe, AZ and since then has been actively involved in the field of Genomics and human health. He has an unparalleled passion for connecting biochemistry with Naturopathic Medicine. From his time in undergraduate studies training for an olympic triathlon, to drug design training in graduate school, he has always had a strong desire to connect science with human health and athletic performance. With a professional career starting in the pharmaceutical industry, as a college professor, and finally as a nutrigenomic consultant, Steve's experience has always been based in science and driven by naturopathic philosophy. He currently works with his wife, Dr. Nasha Winters, ND, FABNO in the support of individuals with cancer using genomic testing and nutrition and training physicians to utilize current advances in these fields. 
See Faculty CV


Gervasio Lamas, MD 

Dr. Lamas is the Chairman of Medicine at Mount Sinai Medical Center and Chief of the Columbia University Division of Cardiology at Mount Sinai Medical Center. He received his B.A. in Biochemical Sciences cum laude from Harvard College and his M.D. with honors (AOA) from New York University. He completed his Internship and Residency at the Brigham and Women's Hospital of Harvard Medical School, where he later served as Assistant Professor of Medicine. Dr. Lamas relocated to South Florida in 1993, when he became Chief of Cardiology at Mount Sinai and later served as the hospital's Director of Cardiovascular Research and Academic Affairs. From June of 2008 until January 2009, he was Director of the Cardiology Fellowship Program at Jackson Memorial Hospital/ VAMC/University of Miami, Director of the U.M. Hospital Coronary Care Unit, and Interim Vice Chair of Clinical Affairs at the U.M. Miller School of Medicine Division of Cardiology. During the last decade, he has enrolled thousands of patients in more than a dozen U.S. and international trials in order to improve cardiac care and prevent death and disability from heart disease. He served as Chairman of the Mode Selection Trial in Sinus Node Dysfunction (MOST), a trial that revolutionized cardiac pacemakers. He presently serves as Co-Chairman for the Occluded Artery Trial (OAT), and Study Chair for the Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT), a $30 million trial sponsored by the National Institutes of Health. He has authored over 300 scientific publications, and maintains an active clinical practice in Miami Beach and Key Biscayne.

See Faculty CV


David Quig, PhD 

David Quig received his Masters degree in Human Nutrition from Virginia Tech, and his PhD in Nutritional Biochemistry from the University of Illinois. He was then a Post-Doctoral Fellow at Cornell University for five years, prior to serving as a Senior Cardiovascular Pharmacologist with a major in pharmaceutical company for seven years. For the past 26 years, he has performed and published research pertaining to nutrition and chronic disease. He regularly gives presentations at international and national biomedical conferences. Dr. Quig is currently Vice President, Scientific Support for Doctor's Data, Inc. where he conducts studies pertaining to the effects of heavy metal and chemical toxicity on nutrition and metabolism and advises medical practitioners about the interpretation of laboratory test results and treatment options for their patients. 



Frederick vom Saal, PhD 

Frederick vom Saal is a professor of reproductive biology in the Division of Biological Sciences at the University of Missouri-Columbia. He has published more than 140 articles concerning the effects of exposure during fetal life to natural hormones, and both man made and naturally occurring endocrine disrupting chemicals on development of the reproductive system and postnatal growth. 

The focus of his current research is on abnormal development of the reproductive system and changes in postnatal growth in mice due to exposure during fetal life to the estrogenic chemical bisphenol A, which is used to make polycarbonate plastic and to line metal cans. In addition, the interaction between bisphenol A and intra-uterine growth (due to differences in placental nutrient transport) as factors involved in adult obesity is being examined. He has presented his research findings at hearings in the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives, the California State Assembly, the EU, Germany, and Japan. He also served on the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Hormonally Active Agents in the Environment. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. The National Institute of Health funds his research. 


Magda Havas, PhD 

Magda Havas is Associate Professor of Environmental & Resource Studies at Trent University where she teaches and does research on the biological effects of environmental contaminants. Dr. Havas received her PhD from the University of Toronto, completed Post Doctoral research at Cornell University, and taught at the University of Toronto before going to Trent University in Petersborough, Canada.

Dr. Havas' research since the 1990's is concerned with the biological effects of electromagnetic pollution including radio frequency radiation, electromagnetic fields, dirty electricity, and ground current. She works with diabetics as well as individuals who have multiple sclerosis, tinnitus, chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia and thos who are electrically hypersensitive. She also conducts research on sick building syndrome as it relates to power quality in schools. 


Stephen Genuis, MD 

Dr. Stephen Genuis is a clinician and researcher involved in many areas of medical science. He is board certified in both Obstetrics and Gynecology as well as in Environmental Medicine and has authored 100 scientific publications for over 50 different peer-reviewed medical journals including Lancent, British Medical Journal, Canadian Medical Association Journal, Public Library of Science, Public Health, and Environmental Research. In addition to writing, he lectures extensively and has reviewed papers for over 70 different scientific and medical publications on issues ranging from medical ethics to environmental health, from evidence-based medicine to nutritional science, and from physician professionalism to medicine and cyberspace. He has served as the women's health care physician for an inner city clinic, worked as an Obstetrician/Gynecologist at a University teaching hospital, and served as co-director of medical services in a West African hospital. Included in his awards are the Commemorative Medal from the Governor General in recognition of significant contribution to Canada, the 1983 'Resident of the Year' award chosen by the graduating medical class at the University of Alberta medical school, and a 'Teacher of the Year' award from the University of Alberta - where he serves as a Clinical Professor in the Faculty of Medicine. He plays piano and sings in a doctor's band called DixieDocs. Most importantly, he enjoys ballroom dancing with his wife Shelagh, and being his five kids' "Pa".


Mitch Kennedy, ND 

Dr. Mitch Kennedy, a graduate of Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine, is a nationally board-certified and licensed primary care physician. He currently consults and provides training to companies desiring ergonomic, non-toxic and healthy work environments, and green buildings. Dr. Kennedy was the first naturopathic physician credentialed to practice at the UCONN's John Dempsey Hospital, seeing patients in the Neag Cancer Center, and Hollfelder Women's Center. As a former clinical instructor with the UConn School of Medicine, he taught medical students the concepts of naturopathic and Chinese medicine.

The core focus of his private practice was the diagnosis and treatment of patients with environmental sensitivities and allergies, and the elimination of chemical over-burden of the internal tissues. Before becoming a naturopathic doctor, Mitch received a bachelors degree from Tufts University, majoring in both Environmental Engineering and Geology, and ran his own consulting firm for 12 years.



Gregg Govett, MD

Dr. Govett graduated from Texas Tech University School of Medicine and completed his post-graduate residency training in Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery at Tulane University in New Orleans, LA. He is certified by the American Board of Otolaryngology, the American Board of Environmental Medicine, and is also a fellow of the American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy. 

Dr. Govett practiced otolaryngology in Chicksaw, OK from 1995-1998. During that time, he encountered a rare, reportable malignancy along with other malignancies that exceeded the statistical incidence of those malignancies in that county. Using toxicology testing, Dr. Govett determined that the malignancies were induced by chlorinated pesticides. Upon making this find, he discovered that crop dusting was pioneered in Grady County, OK after WWII. 



David Carpenter, MD

David Carpenter is a public health physician whose current position is Director of the Institute for Health and the Environment at the University at Albany, as well as Professor of Environmental Health Sciences within the School of Public Health at the University at Albany. 

After receiving his MD degree from Harvard Medical School he chose a career of research and public health. After research positions at the National Institute of Mental Health and the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, he came to Albany in 1980 as the Director of the Wadsworth Center for Laboratories and Research of the New York State Department of Health, the third largest public health laboratory in the US after NIH and CDC. In an effort to build ties to an academic program, he initiated efforts to create a partnership between the New York State Department of Health and the University at Albany, resulting in the creation of the School of Public Health in 1985. He was then appointed as founding Dean of the School of Public Health, a position he held until 1998 when he became the Director of the Institute of Health and the Environment. 


William Rea, MD

William Rea, MD is thoracic and cardiovascular surgeon with a strong passion for the environmental aspects of health and disease. Founder of the Environmental Health Center (EHC-D), Dr. Rea is currently director of this highly specialized Dallas based medical facility. In 1998, Dr. Rea was named to the world's first professional chair of environmental medicine at the Robens Institute of Toxicology at the University of Surry in Guildford, England. He was also awarded to Jonathan Forman Gold Medal Award in 1987 and the Herbert J. Rinkel Award in 1993, both by the American Academy of Environmental Medicine, as well as named Outstanding Alumnus by Otterbein College in 1991. 

From 1984-85, Dr. Rea held the position of adjunct professor of environmental sciences and mathematics at the University of Texas, while from 1972-82, he acted as clinical associate professor of thoracic surgery at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School. He also served as chief of thoracic surgery at Veterans Hospital and as adjunct professor of psychology and guest lecturer at North Texas State University.  

Jeffrey Smith

The leading consumer advocate promoting healthier non-GMO choices, Jeffrey Smith's meticulous research documents how biotech companies continue to mislead legislators and safety officials to put the health of society at risk and the environment in peril. His work expertly summarizes why the safety assessments conducted by the FDA and regulators worldwide teeter on a foundation of outdated science and false assumptions, and why genetically engineered foods must urgently become our nation's top food safety priority. 

Mr. Smith is the founding executive director of The Institute for Responsible Technology (IRT), a leading source of GMO health risk information for consumers, policy makers, and healthcare professionals. IRT's educational programs are driving the tipping point of consumer rejection against GMO's, which is already starting to push genetically engineered ingredients out of the markets in the U.S.

Mr. Smith lives in Iowa, surrounded by genetically modified soybeans and corn. 

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Learning Objectives 


General Principles of Toxicant Exposure and Assessment
2.00 General Credit Hours by the OBNM

At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to: 
  1. Identify exposures that contribute to total body burden
  2. Evaluate patients for toxicant exposures that relate to current signs and symptoms
  3. Effectively apply the principles of avoidance of identified toxicant exposures in counseling patients in order to improve treatment outcomes in environmentally-exposed patients 
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    Individual Risk: The Influence of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms, Nutrient Deficiencies, Synergism of Simultaneous Exposures on Total Body Burden, and the Manifestation of Disease
    2.00 General Credit Hours by the OBNM

     

    At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:
    1. Evaluate the effect of specific single nucleotide polymorphisms in patients with environmental illness
    2. Apply specific interventions that treat symptoms related to single nucleotide polymorphisms
    3. Utilize data on toxicant interactions to assess multiple toxicant exposures in patients and determine appropriate interventions that improve symptom severity in patients with environmental illnesses 
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      Physical Exam & Laboratory Evaluation
      2.00 General Credit Hours by the OBNM


      At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to: 
      1. Utilize skills in performing physical evaluations of patients with toxicant exposures to assess the degree of pathology related to the exposure and to assist in identifying the class of toxicants (metals, pesticides, solvents) involved so that appropriate labs can be ordered
      2. Apply appropriate laboratory testing for evaluation of toxicant exposures to correctly assess exposure-related body burden and intervene effectively
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      Mercury Toxicology
      2.00 General Credit Hours by the OBNM

       

      At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to: 
      1. Differentiate the major forms of mercury that humans are exposed to and understand their differences
      2. Assess the values and limitations of different testing approaches for mercury
      3. Define the 3 Phases of Detoxification
      4. Understand the Glutathione System and its central importance to health and detoxification
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      Lead Toxicity
      2.00 General Credit Hours by the OBNM

       

      At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to: 
      1. Identify sources and conditions related to lead exposure in children and adults in order to correctly diagnose and treat these cases
      2. Apply appropriate interventions in cases of lead toxicity to improve outcomes in patients who have been exposed to lead  
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      Arsenic & Cadmium Toxicity
      2.00 General Credit Hours by the OBNM

       

      At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to: 
      1. Identify sources and conditions related to arsenic and cadmium exposure in children and adults in order to correctly diagnose and treat these cases
      2. Apply appropriate interventions in cases of arsenic and cadmium toxicity to improve outcomes in patients who have been exposed to arsenic and cadmium   
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      Air and Water Filtration Technologies
      2.00 General Credit Hours by the OBNM

      At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:
      1. Identify the current technologies for air and water filtration. 
      2. Define the benefits and shortcomings of each technology
      3. Educate their patients about the need for and appropriate technologies for residential air and water filtration.
      4. Identify sources and conditions related to fluoride exposure in children and adults in order to correctly diagnose and treat these cases.

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      Consider Zebras: Assessment and Management of Other Problematic Metals in Clinical Practice
      2.00 General Credit Hours by the OBNM

       

      At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to: 
      1. Identify sources and conditions related to other toxic metal exposure in children and adults in order to correctly diagnose and treat these cases
      2. Reference appropriate interventions in cases of metals toxicity to improve outcomes in patients who have been exposed to toxic metals 
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      TACT Trial: Efficacy of EDTA Chelation in Cardiovascular Disease
      1.00 General Credit Hours by the OBNM

       

      At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:
      1. Apply knowledge based on TACT trial outcomes when assessing treatment for cardiovascular disease in those with prior myocardial infarctions in order to decrease risk for further events in these patients
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      EDTA: Theoretical Mechanisms of EDTA as a Chelating Agent
      1.00 General Credit Hour and 1.00 Pharmacy Credit Hour by the OBNM

      At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to: 
      1. Utilize knowledge of the pharmacologic effect of EDTA on nitric oxide to utilize EDTA more safely and effectively in improving patient outcomes in vascular disease.
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      DMSA | EDTA | DMPS: Pharmacology and Dosing of Chelating Agents in Metals Toxicity
      2.00 Pharmacy Credit Hours by the OBNM

       

      At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to: 
      1. Utilize pharmacologic chelating agents safely and appropriately in patients with toxic metal burden to improve patient outcomes in metal toxic patients
      2. Through actual patient cases, participants will gain knowledge of the appropriate management of patients taking chelating agents
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      The Application of Glutathione and Glutathione Prodrugs in the Management of Environmental Illness
      1.00 General Credit Hour and 1.00 Pharmacy Credit Hour by the OBNM

       

      At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:
      1. Identify patient scenarios in which glutathione use is appropriate in order to improve patient outcomes
      2. Identify the role glutathione depletion plays in the initiation and progression of environmental exposure-related conditions in order to more effectively treat these conditions and improve patient outcomes
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      Pesticides: Understanding Chronic Exposure
      2.00 General Credit Hours by the OBNM


      At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:
      1. Utilize knowledge of sources of pesticide exposure to more effectively teach patients about avoidance in order to prevent conditions related to pesticide exposure
      2. Evaluate and treat signs and symptoms related to pesticide exposure more effectively in patients who have both occupational and non-occupational pesticide exposure
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      Herbicides: Glyphosate as a Case Study in Herbicide Exposure Related to Disease Relevance
      2.00 General Credit Hours by the OBNM

       

      At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:
      1. Recognize exposure sources of glyphosate in order to more effectively counsel their patients on avoidance and reduce exposure
      2. Identify toxic effects of glyphosate in order to counsel patients on avoidance and reduce exposure
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      Persistent Organic Pollutants and Endocrine Disruption
      2.00 General Credit Hours by the OBNM

      At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to: 
      1. Identify exposure sources of persistent organic pollutants and their related effects in order to better provide avoidance counseling to their patients, particularly conception-age females
      2. Identify disease conditions related to persistent organic pollutant exposure and become skilled at interventions that lower body burden of these toxicants
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      Plastics (BPA & Phthalates)
      2.00 General Credit Hours by the OBNM

       

      At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:
      1. Identify exposure sources of BPA and phthalates in patient environments in order to more effectively counsel patients on exposure and avoidance
      2. Utilize screening tools to assess exposure to phthalates in patients at risk
      3. Educate patients (especially women of childbearing age and mothers) about avoidance of BPA and phthalates for themselves and their families 
      4. Be familiar with research related to attempts to reduce body burden of BPA and phthalates
      5. Implement strategies for body burden reduction 
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      Solvents
      2.00 General Credit Hours by the OBNM

      At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:
      1. Identify signs and symptoms seen in non-occupational solvent exposure in order to recognize and intervene effectively in patient care
      2. Gain proficiency in treating solvent exposure-related symptoms in patients with conditions related to known solvent exposure
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      Mold Toxicity
      1.00 General Credit Hour and 1.00 Pharmacy Credit Hour by the OBNM

       

      At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:
      1. Assess and diagnose mold exposure to intervene effectively in mold-exposed patients
      2. Develop familiarity with the treatment of mold-exposed patients to improve their quality of life
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      Electromagnetic Frequency-Related Exposure and Sensitivity
      2.00 General Credit Hours by the OBNM

      At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:
      1.  Gain familiarity with the signs, symptoms, and pathology related to electromagnetic frequency exposure-related conditions in order to be able to recognize and treat them effectively
      2. Effectively counsel patients in the area of EMF avoidance to manage their symptoms
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      Case Management Questions in Environmental Medicine (Mold) 
      February 2, 2015 | 5:30 - 7:30 PM PST
      *not approved for CE credit 

      At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:
      1. Apply their knowledge of case management in environmental medicine to patients who have been diagnosed with toxic exposure in order to improve treatment of these patients
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      Transgenic Foods (GMO) - The Evidence: A Review of the Published Research on the Effects of Transgenic Foods in both Animal and Humans
      2.00 General Credit Hours by the OBNM

      At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:
      1. Effectively counsel patients who have concerns related to genetically-modified foods and their relationship to health
      2. Apply the science behind transgenic foods and their relationship to disease as a tool in patient education in order to more effectively use the prescription of avoidance as an intervention
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      Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Health Effects 
      2.00 General Credit Hours by the OBNM

      At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to: 
      1. Identify sources of low-level ionizing radiation based on historical demographics and current exposure data
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      Case Management in Environmental Exposure: Case Reviews Involving Toxicant-Exposed Patients with the Evaluation of Treatment Protocols
      1.00 General Credit Hour and 1.00 Pharmacy Credit Hour by the OBNM

       

      At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:
      1. Apply their knowledge of case management in environmental medicine to patients who have been diagnosed with toxic exposure in order to improve treatment of these patients
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      Sponsors
       


      The educational activity is supported (in part) by: 

                                                                               
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